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Spectrum could be fined by city of Lexington over customer complaints

On Thursday night, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council will vote on a resolution demanding that Spectrum work out its customer service issues or face fines.

LEXINGTON, Ky. - Lexington leaders may soon take action against the city's cable provider. On Thursday night, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council will vote on a resolution demanding that Spectrum work out its customer service issues or face fines. It's a step city officials say the council has never taken in the history of a cable franchise. They say it's a testament to how serious the problem is. There have been thousands of complaints about Spectrum.

"Since the beginning of this year, we have received a huge increase in the number of complaints that have come into the city regarding Spectrum," said Roger Daman with the city of Lexington. "We have heard some very disturbing complaints. That's why we are doing this."

Those complaints include not allowing customers to speak to supervisors, charging people for channels or services they did not request, rate increases for people on fixed incomes and not allowing equipment to be returned by mail.

"First, we sent a couple of letters to Spectrum asking them to abide by the franchise," said Daman. "Then we had a meeting with them. Then we followed that up with a public meeting."

Hundreds of people showed up to that meeting. The resolution the Urban County Council will vote on Thursday gives the company 30 days to address the complaints. If Spectrum does not comply, the city could fine them $500 per day for every violation.

Spectrum spokesman Mike Pedelty released a statement Wednesday saying "we continue to work with the city, and directly with our customers, on their questions about the transition to Spectrum. As we move forward, more and more customers are benefiting from our consumer-friendly policies including no data caps, modem fees or service contracts."

Pedelty also pointed out that Spectrum has lower equipment costs than the city's previous cable p

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