LEXINGTON, Ky. (FOX 56) – Lexington elected two new state representatives this week, passing the torch from two longtime lawmakers—who did not seek re-election—to serve the city in Frankfort.

Chad Aull and Lindsey Burke are the two Democrats elected to represent the 79th and 75th house districts, respectively.

Republicans fielded no candidates in either of those races which means after both of their landslide wins in the primaries, they’re now on their way to the Kentucky Capitol.

The current representatives in those seats, Susan Westrom and Kelly Flood, will fill out their terms through the rest of this year. Aull and Burke will be sworn in at the beginning of 2023, just in time for the legislative session.

As Democrats, Aull and Burke aren’t jaded about the uphill battle they’ll face to achieve some of their legislative priorities, but both are open to bipartisanship.

Chad Aull

“I don’t want to go to Frankfort just to fight with the other side and say no, I’d actually like to get some things done,” Aull told FOX 56.

“I expect to be an active member of the legislature putting my name on several bills – sponsoring several bills and I’m going to sponsor bills that I know aren’t going to pass but they’re still the right types of pieces of legislation to try to pass,” Aull said.

Aull has a background in agriculture and IT. In addition to guiding policy in these areas, he’s also prioritizing public education.

“We need to fully fund our public schools first. We need to expand Pre-K education and we need to really fund our state-funded universities back to the levels they were previously,” he said.

Lindsey Burke

“Just like as a social worker, now as an attorney, I’ve hit a wall and I’m doing as much as I can for one person or one family at a time, but being a representative will allow me to impact more people,” Burke said.

“If I hear a proposal from a Republican that I think is a solid proposal then I am going to support it, it doesn’t matter to me that we’re not on the same team,” Burke said.

Burke has worked as a social worker and attorney and operates a non-profit to make legal services more accessible. The most important issue to her: affordable housing.

“So many other problems can’t be properly addressed if someone doesn’t know where they’re going to sleep tonight or they’re worried they’re going to be evicted by the end of the month,” she said.

Capping prescription prices, funding public schools, and taking care of the environment are other priorities on Burke’s platform.